10 Minutes to 10 more yards!

How much money do you spend every year on trying to improve your golf game?

$500 on that new M2 driver, $300 on those comfortable new performance FootJoys, not to mention the multiple lesson packages over the course of year. Although well fitted clubs and apparel are important, and of course the input from a professional is invaluable, you are missing out one of the most important facets of your golf game. You! Constant changing of equipment in order to improve your game can be compared to the Ferrari F1 team trying new colour schemes, new uniforms for the drivers, without doing anything to improve the car itself. Put simply, having a better body will have you playing better golf.

You cant go onto social media these days without seeing videos of Rory, DJ, Jordan and Jason working out with their trainers. Funny how I just mentioned the top 4 players in the world at the minute? More and more professionals are waking up to the improvements they can make in their game with small changes in their physical fitness. If it works for finely tuned athletes like the pros, it works 10 fold for us amateurs.

Our daily routines do not prepare us for the game of golf. Most of us spend Monday to Fridays seated at a desk, at a steering wheel, or on the couch, with maybe an hour or two at the gym if we’re lucky. This lifestyle does not prepare us at all for the physical requirements of the game of golf. If we don’t turn or rotate our bodies at any time throughout the week, Saturday mornings first tee shot becomes even more of a challenge. Not to mention the closing three holes where our bodies have thrown in the towel.

Coaches all the time tell us the importance of turning, rotating, posture, weight shift etc. However, it can by nigh on impossible to avoid these flaws if your body is too stiff, weak or off balance to cope with the demands of what the coach wants you to do. Thats why at the UFIT Clinic, we assess your body to establish your physical abilities to efficiently swing a golf club. By performing our Titleist Performance Institute screening with our Golf Physiotherapist, you will get a picture of where you are lacking physically and where you need to improve.

Ok, so you've showed me what I am struggling with, how are you going to help me? Physical improvements can occur at home, in the gym, at the range, wherever you can find time. Also, don’t think you have to find hours in your busy schedules to make improvements. As little as 10 minutes at home can help you hit longer and more accurate.

Common Example

A lot of golfers struggle with their shoulder turns into the back swing, causing a lot of us to standup in the swing which means we will be club path on the downswing will be affected. A simple circuit for improving your shoulder turn in less than 10 minutes can be seen below.

Performing a bow and arrow movement. Open the chest for ten repetitions. You should feel the stretch in your shoulder, chest and mid back.

Performing a bow and arrow movement. Open the chest for ten repetitions. You should feel the stretch in your shoulder, chest and mid back.

With your hand behind your head, open your chest by raising your elbow up towards the ceiling. The stretch should be felt in the chest and upper back. Perform 10-12 repetitions.

With your hand behind your head, open your chest by raising your elbow up towards the ceiling. The stretch should be felt in the chest and upper back. Perform 10-12 repetitions.

Using a foam roller between the shoulder blades, mobilise the upper back by extending over the foam roller. Hold for two deep breathes and relax. Repeat eight repetitions.

Using a foam roller between the shoulder blades, mobilise the upper back by extending over the foam roller. Hold for two deep breathes and relax. Repeat eight repetitions.

Perform this circuit for 10 minutes twice a day, and watch your clubhead speed, club path and plane and your finish improve before your eyes!

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

As a musculoskeletal physiotherapist, Paul has a extensive experience within professional sport (Football Association of Singapore), private physiotherapy and in the public hospital sector (Singapore General Hospital). Having experienced the profession in a number of settings, Paul has developed a keen insight into what is required to help people of all ages and athletic levels.