Pre-habilitation for runners with Mok Ying Rong

Meet Mok Ying Rong, our new physiotherapist at the UFIT one-north Clinic. A competitive runner and Nike Sponsored elite athlete, Ying is Singapore’s Half-Marathon record holder,  and well placed to help clients recover from sporting-relating issues!

She’s joined up with #ROCKrunners in the lead-up to the Singapore Standard Chartered Marathon, where she’ll be giving talks on one of her passions – running pre-habilitation!

Tell us about your sporting and running background

I’ve always been too active! I started competitive swimming in primary school and represented my swimming club and school at national and club levels. I moved on to triathlons in high school before running seriously at 16 and representing my school, Raffles Girls Secondary, at national meets. I was getting on the podium at these and decided to try national level events.

At first, it was intimidating running with the giants but as I ramped up my training and became more systematic, found myself winning more and more races. I’ve always been self-coached, I feel very tuned-in with my body, and pretty soon, found myself knowing what works and what doesn’t. My first race representing Singapore was the Asian Cross Country in Bahrain when I was 16.

What have been your career highlights?

Signing a contract with Nike when I was in high school and representing Singapore in the 2016 World Cross Country Championships. The partnership with Nike really boosted my confidence in my training and racing, and I’ve been representing them for almost 7 years and am simply thankful for their unwavering support.

My most significant career highlight is definitely winning the 2016 Gyeongju Cherry Blossom Half Marathon, breaking the Singapore Half Marathon record by 2 seconds! My time was 1:23:14 and I vividly remember it to be one of the most painful and intense race I have ever done.

How do you train for your races?

I select the main races I’ll do at the start of the year and then periodise my training phases. Some overseas races pop up and I take them in my stride. I’ve always believed in the journey, rather than an end-goal as running is my passion, and always make sure I do my conditioning and prehab work so I can progress my running fitness safely.

What got you into physiotherapy?

I was getting my fair share of injuries, my most tragic moment being having 5 stress fractures at one time over my left foot. I also had multiple shoulder issues from swimming. I started to do my own research to understand why I was getting injured which sparked my interest in physio and I knew this was the career for me.

Mok3.png

What is pre-habilitation?

As a physiotherapy student, I did workshops with companies and small interest groups, spreading my passion for pre-habilitation (prevention instead of rehabilitation) for runners. I initiated a project called ‘RunFree’ when I was in my 3rd year, which believed that running should be free for all, made possible if people can run free from injuries. I’ve run sessions for anyone wanting to progress their running safely, including a movement screen based on research and running biomechanics, followed by guidance with these runners on a safe running program.

What’s in your head before a race?

I’m still bad at this – always getting nervous before a race! But my favourite mantra for myself would be – just run! Just get out and run. No fear! ☺

Come and meet her at the UFIT one-north Clinic or within the UFIT running community very soon.