Age is just a number when it comes to fitness

Ever heard the expression: “Age is just a number.”?

When it comes to health and fitness, this expression is 100% true. A 40 or 50-year-old who trains regularly and looks after their nutrition will likely to be in a lot better shape than a 20-year-old living a sedate lifestyle and eating a diet of junk food and fizzy drinks. 

 Don't let age define what you can, or cannot do.

Don't let age define what you can, or cannot do.

Take a look at the image below comparing the MRI scans of the quadriceps of 3 different individuals:

MRI bone scan.jpg

The amazing thing is that these legs may even look quite similar on the outside, but notice the difference once we look into the scans!

As you can see, it is not the age that makes the difference, but the lifestyle. (Never let anyone tell you that you are too old to do something!) Those who maintain an active lifestyle and eat clean, nutritious food is more likely to be healthy, whereas those who are not as active will lose fitness and function more quickly as you age. Losing fitness and function is a huge issue for the elderly, as it will lead to a sharp decline in independence.

As we get older, the cells in our body don’t regenerate as fast or as well as they once did, which results in a longer recovery time. A hamstring strain in a teenager should heal faster than someone in their 40s (presuming they’ve done their rehab correctly). One reason for this physiologically is that elastin – the component that allows tissues to stretch – slows down in production considerably after 40.

As well as having less flexible tissues, lubricant in your joints (known as the synovial fluid) lessens, which reduces the shock-absorbing capacity, increasing the chances of developing Osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, there is no way of reversing the loss of synovial fluid production, it is simply part and parcel of the aging process.

One of the most common issues we see in the clinics is Knee Arthritis, and best way to treat this is to reduce the stress on your joints. This doesn’t mean sitting down all day. On the contrary, it means modifying the exercises you do, and correctly loading the joints by strengthening the surrounding muscles. By strengthening the muscles around your legs, they are capable of accepting a greater load, meaning that less force will go onto the knee.

The American College of Sports Medicine states that the population who benefit the most from exercise are post-menopausal women. Exercise helps to fight against Osteoporosis by reducing the breakdown of bone density, which many post-menopausal women tend to suffer from.

As with all things, prevention is better than cure. So it is essential that you maintain a strong foundation of fitness and health. Rather than playing catch up on your health trying to fight off the effects of an unhealthy lifestyle, it is better and easier to look after yourself throughout your life by maintaining a good level of fitness.

As a rule of thumb, the most important muscles to look after as you get older are your quadriceps at the front of your thighs. They are important to strengthen in order to reduce the risk of arthritic pain as you reach middle age, and for the elderly past their 60s - the strength to stand up and walk independently.

For the “weekend warriors” with desk-bound jobs (which applies to most readers), it is essential that you stretch and mobilise your back before every training. If you are not warming up properly prior to your workouts after sitting for prolonged periods, you will likely be too stiff and immobile, which can lead to compensations and injuries in the upper and lower back, hips, shoulders, and neck.

 

Here are some simple exercises you can do at home regularly to maintain your strength and mobility:

  1. Foam rolling your upper and lower back.

1. Foam rolling your upper and lower back.

  2. Leg-over rotations.

2. Leg-over rotations.

  3. Open book upper back rotations with foam roller support.

3. Open book upper back rotations with foam roller support.

  4. Wall squats - these can be done as holds in the bottom position.

4. Wall squats - these can be done as holds in the bottom position.

  5. Straight leg raises (if wall squats are irritable on the knees).

5. Straight leg raises (if wall squats are irritable on the knees).

Aging (and the body aches and deterioration that comes with it) is a part of nature’s process that unfortunately cannot be reversed. However, staying fit and healthy is a choice that you can make. Keeping strong and mobile is the key to injury and illness prevention, allowing you to live your life to the fullest even as you get older!

For a customised and extensive assessment of your physical well-being and muscle health, book a consultation with a Physiotherapist.


About the Author

Kieran Sasiadek is a UK trained Physiotherapist with extensive clinical experience at UK’s NHS hospitals and clinics, as well as with professional football club Burnley FC. In Singapore, Kieran spent three years with Jurong Health Services working with the Intensive Care, General Medicine, Orthopaedics, and Sports Rehabilitation units. He also presented published research in that time. Subsequently, he was the Head of Physiotherapy at a private clinic before joining UFIT Clinic.

Kieran is an avid sportsman, active in rugby, touch rugby, soccer, Gaelic football, and basketball. His love of sports compliments his passion in treating sports injuries in amateur and professional athletes. His main ethos is to provide his clients with the independence to take control of their rehabilitation program, and enjoy the process of recovery.