UFIT Singapore

Have a RAD six pack? Not as cool as you may think!

Rectus abdominis diastasis (or otherwise known as abdominal separation) refers to the separation of the 6-pack muscles from the midline of the abdominal wall. This commonly happens during the later stages of pregnancy, and if left untreated may lead to post childbirth issues such as pelvic girdle instability, lower back and pelvic pain.

Too scared to jump on a trampoline with your kids? Not sure when to return to exercise after having your baby?

Maybe you should see a Women’s Health and Continence Physio!

What does a women’s health and continence (WH &C) physiotherapist do?

A WH & C Physio is a physiotherapist that has done additional study at University to specialise in the areas of continence and women’s health. They can treat every day aches and pains and sports injuries but are also able to treat conditions related to pregnancy and pelvic floor muscle dysfunction.

 What does an assessment with a women’s health and continence physiotherapist involve?

Initial assessments are usually between 45 minutes and an hour long. The physiotherapist will spend most of the first session asking questions to determine the source of your symptoms. If the pelvic floor muscles need to be examined, the initial and follow up assessments may involve the use of real-time ultrasound over the lower abdomen, to providing visual biofeedback during pelvic floor muscle training.

What conditions do women’s health and continence physiotherapists treat?

WH & C physiotherapists treat a diverse range of conditions related to pregnancy and the postnatal period as well as conditions related to pelvic floor muscle deficiency in men and women at any point in their lifespan, including: 

 1. Antenatal services

  • Management of musculoskeletal complaints such as back and pelvic pain, pubic symphysis disorder and carpal tunnel syndrome
  • Advice on exercise in pregnancy
  • Pelvic floor muscle assessments.

2. Postnatal services

  • Management of musculoskeletal conditions such as back and pelvic pain and
    de Quervain’s tenosynovitis
  • Assessment and management of abdominal separation
  • Pelvic floor muscle assessments
  • Advice on return to exercise
  • Treatment of blocked milk ducts
  • Treatment of perineal pain and swelling after delivery
  • Pelvic floor muscle rehabilitation after obstetric tears
  • Assessment of altered bladder sensation.

3. Other conditions treated by a women’s health and continence physiotherapist

  • Urinary incontinence
  • Faecal incontinence
  • Constipation
  • Pelvic organ prolapse
  • Painful intercourse
  • Vaginismus
  • Provoked vestibulodynia
  • Coccyx pain.

If you would like further information on the services or if you would like to book an appointment please contact UFIT clinic.


About the author

After spending the first part of her career juggling work, athletics and travel, Kelly decided to pursue her passion for Women’s Health and completed a Graduate Certificate in Continence and Women's Health at Curtin University. Upon completion of her course, Kelly worked for a specialist Women’s and Men’s Health and Continence Clinic where she gained further experience in the assessment and management of ante-natal and post-natal conditions, incontinence, post prostatectomy complications and pelvic pain disorders. Read more

The Benefits of At Home Physiotherapy by Health Comes to You

Health Comes to You is Singapore’s premium at home physiotherapy service. We offer a full range of physiotherapy interventions, provided to you by a team of specialist male and female therapists, both locally and internationally trained.

Our team includes;

  • Orthopaedic (after surgery) physiotherapists
  • Physiotherapist trained in treating pain and injury
  • Paediatric physiotherapists
  • Neurological physiotherapists
  • Osteoporosis and Parkinson's Disease physiotherapists

Why choose at home physio? Well, many people prefer at home physiotherapy because after just one session it is possible for your therapist to fully understand your needs as an individual (yes, every patient is different!) This is because performing physiotherapy in your home environment means that your therapist can witness your problems first hand.

There are many other reasons that make at home physiotherapy a great choice, here are some of them:

1. Convenience

-        To put it simply, we do all the travel so that you don’t have to! Many of us in Singapore work very long hours and are ‘time poor’, having physio at home will certainly help free up your day and reduce the need (and stress) of making additional arrangements e.g. childcare

-        If your mobility is currently an issue (for example after surgery), this removes the problem, and the expense of getting to a clinic for treatment

 

2. Flexible appointments

-        We appreciate that you may need to see a physiotherapy outside of normal working hours, this is why we offer evening and weekend appointments at no extra cost

3. Health Insurance compatible – offering the cashless method

-        The great news is that physiotherapy at home is fully claimable under insurance. In many circumstances you won’t need to pay a cent, as the company deals directly with your insurance of your behalf

4. Personalised service

-        Physiotherapy at home is highly personal and many of our patients feel more relaxed exploring pain or discussing medical complaints at home than they do behind a curtain or in a cubicle

-        Physiotherapy at home also means that you have the freedom to explore alternative treatment modalities with your physiotherapy, such as hydrotherapy (water based rehab), gym based rehab and Pilates

-        We provide equipment to be used during the session, and will assist you to source any additional equipment that you may need e.g. foam roller

Are you ready to start physio at home in Singapore? Contact us today to arrange an initial assessment with one of our specialist physios on +65 8358 2144 or email info@healthcomestoyou.com.

Benefits of Prenatal Yoga – Alana Saphin-Polchleb

I have been practicing yoga for over 12 years and have slowly transitioned from a practice focused on dynamic, sweat inducing yoga to being able to understand and appreciate the benefits of slowing down the practice and the mind. When my husband and I found out we were pregnant with our first child in August last year, the benefits of this transition really came to fruition as prenatal yoga became more than just a “yoga class”, but also a place for relaxation, mindfulness and birth preparation. 

There are many benefits of practicing yoga while you are pregnant, here are just 5; 

1. Yoga develops strength, flexibility and stamina

Pregnancy and labour is most certainly a marathon not a sprint and as your baby grows inside your belly more energy and strength is required to help carry the extra weight. Yoga helps you strengthen your hips, back, arms and shoulders. A woman who is in the best possible shape for the challenge of labour and beyond, both mentally and physically, will also most likely recover faster after the bub has arrived. 


2. Promotes emotional well being, relaxation and stress management

Through deep breathing the nervous system goes into parasympathetic mode, which promotes relaxation. Learning how to control your breath during yoga can be challenging however; this awareness and control is not only an effective tool during pregnancy to help calm and reduce anxiety, it is also a technique to help with pain management, allowing you to focus and relax during labour. 

3. Important birth muscles are toned

Prenatal yoga encourages deep toning of the pelvic floor, hip and transverse abdominal muscles.  Building and maintaining this muscle tone through out your pregnancy can not only alleviate muscle aches and pains throughout the 9 months but also facilitate a speedy postnatal recovery. 

4. Connection with your Bubba

A prenatal yoga practice at least once a week allows you to take some time out of your busy schedule to bond with your growing baby. Slowing down, breathing deeply and connecting with your baby as your pregnancy progresses allows you to focus on how your body responds differently to the changes that are happening week to week. 

5. Relief from common pregnancy complaints

A regular prenatal yoga practice can help to reduce or alleviate common pregnancy complaints such as easing heartburn, fluid retention and muscle cramps to name a few. By stretching and toning your muscles you can also help blood circulate through the body in a healthy way as well as alleviate back, neck and hip pain which is often caused by the increasing stress from the growing weight of the baby. 

You certainly don’t have to have been practicing yoga for 12 years to gain these benefits. If you have some experience in practicing yoga prior to your pregnancy, with your drs consent, you can commence prenatal practice. If you’ve had little to no yoga experience that’s also fine; following the all clear from your dr at 12 weeks. 

 

Great Quads, But Is It Any Good For Your Feet?

All high-impact workouts put strain on your feet and ankles, but Crossfit’s and Bootcamps mix of weights, jumps, and cardio can place additional types of pressure on your feet.

These types of stresses have led to misrepresentations in the media. CrossFit has a reputation of being dangerous, with stories of sprained ankles, plantar fasciitis or stress fractures, but these tend to be rare outcomes, and there’s no research based evidence that CrossFit is any more dangerous than other forms of intensive exercise. One study found that 70% of participants had been injured at some point which sounds like a lot, but researchers estimated the rate was three injuries per 1,000 hours trained.  That’s roughly the same as you’d expect to get from gymnastics, and far safer than contact sports like rugby.

Still, there are some aspects of CrossFit which make it risky.  The emphasis on high reps and heavy weights, mean you must have a good trainer.  Many trainers have only a weekend’s training in CrossFit methods, and no expertise in biomechanics, and they may be oblivious to small mistakes in technique which can lead to big problems in the long term.  The team mentality means CrossFitters encourage each other to push past the pain barrier; which is fantastic if you’re lacking motivation, but extremely dangerous if you’re on the brink of injuring yourself.

Many people have inherent imbalances, joint limitations or they may be harbouring niggling injuries which make exercise injuries more common. Niggling injuries are easier to overlook if they are in your feet or legs. For sports people it is very easy to ignore a recurring injury if it seems small, but as with most injuries the most serious often start years before as a niggle or an ache, with appropriate screening the more serious injuries can often be prevented.

Years of sedentary living and poor posture can lead to significant muscle weaknesses, leaving people much stronger on their dominant side.  Even people who are fairly active often have muscle weaknesses that leave them out of alignment: for example, if you always carry a heavy handbag on your right shoulder then it will leave you stronger on that side of your body.  It’s also very common also have one leg slightly longer than the other

In everyday life, you’re unlikely to notice that one of your legs is a little shorter or you are suffering from ankle instability.  But once you start doing intense WODs, lifting huge weights, or running long distances, the lopsided distribution of your body weight can lead to long-term problems with your ankles and knees.  Unless you drop a barbell on your foot, most injuries are caused by problems building up over time as the strain on your body exacerbates pre-existing issues. 

Eventually, though, building muscle strength through CrossFit will leave you less injury-prone, since stronger muscles are less likely to tear.  You just have to make sure you’re pushing your body safely.  Wearing well-fitted shoes is proven to reduce your risk of injuries from exercise, but since there’s such a variety of activities in a CrossFit class it can be hard to choose the right footwear. There is a large debate currently between the two most common shoes used in CrossFit, but we will broach this another time.  As with all new sports and activities, there are some ideas about health and fitness which are widespread but not really backed up by scientific evidence.  Eating paleo is one, doing multiple sets of Olympic lifts is another. There’s a widespread idea that the best shoe for CrossFit is one with a very flexible sole and zero drop – that is, a shoe that keeps your heel exactly level with your toes.

It is important to have a new shoe for each sporting activity, and with the variation of movements and activities in CrossFit, in theory, you’d need a different type of shoe for each activity – one for cardio, one for lifts, and one for jumps. Since everybody knows how to run or jump but most people have never done clean-and-jerks before starting CrossFit, it makes sense to focus on getting a good pair of weightlifting shoes. 

Weightlifting shoes are very different running shoes.  They usually have a slight wedge shape to them, because lifting the heel slightly reduces pressure on the spine while lifting and forces the quads to take more of the weight.  The raised heel also discourages you from lifting the ankle or rolling sideways into ‘duck feet.'  

Done correctly, with good form, weightlifting actually strengthens the bones in your feet and ankles, but done incorrectly it can cause nasty chronic injuries like collapsed arches.  Women should be especially careful to wear the right shoes for lifting weights.  A study found that men tended to get more ‘typical’ weightlifting injuries, like shoulder sprains or muscle tears in the arms, while women were more vulnerable to hurting their knees and ankles.

CrossFit is great for your cardiovascular fitness, it burns hundreds of calories a session, and all those squats will give you glutes that could crack a walnut. Just make sure that you’re taking good care of your feet and ankles, or you could end up ruining all your gains by getting injured. 


About the author

Tim has been working in Singapore for 6 years, he spent 2 years at Tan Tock Seng Hospital before moving to The Foot Practice. Tim recently joined the UFIT Clinic team to help support our CrossFit Tanjong Pagar and CrossFit Bukit Timah athletes.

He has previously worked at Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge (UK) whilst also working under several renowned Podiatric surgeons in London. Tim has worked in Southern India, Peru and China treating a whole range of different foot types.  

He specialises in non-surgical treatment of the foot and ankle, with special interest to sports injuries and paediatric foot care. With a specialist interest in the effect of custom made orthotics and the effect on foot health. 

Runners: Your Missing Ingredient To Success!

Most runners run because they love running. They love getting out on the road or the track, they love the time to reset, to reflect, and they love the feeling of achievement after every run – from a competitive race to a slow jog around the park! But what if I told you that there was a way to make your running smoother and faster, to avoid running injuries,  and therefore to get more enjoyment out of it!

Running is essentially a series of one legged hops in a row. In order to improve this, you need to develop the strength and the stability of the movement. The best way to do this is to Squat.

Air Squats

Air Squats

Back Squats

Back Squats

There really is not a better exercise to focus on your core, hips, glutes, and leg strength. Any runner who does not squat is missing out on all the benefits this exercise brings in terms of strength and stability. It can also help to erase any muscle imbalances you have, where one side of your body is doing all the work! Start off just doing body weight squats, ensuring your knees are in line with your toes, and do not extend over your toes. If you can manage this, add a small weight like a medicine ball. Aim for a high volume of reps in order to mimic more closely the requirements of running! You will very soon start feeling the benefit in your muscles, and see the benefits in your running times!

Once you have mastered the squat you can progress to exercises on a single leg.

If you are unsure if you are doing it correctly, or if the squatting movement causes you pain, speak to a good sports trainer or physiotherapist about assessing the movement before you add weigh to it!

See your UFIT Clinic Physiotherapist to get you back to full health today!

Glutes: The Running Engine

Most runners run because they love running. They love getting out on the road or the track, they love the time to reset, to reflect, and they love the feeling of achievement after every run – from a competitive race to a slow jog around the park! But what if I told you that there was a way to make your running smoother and faster, to avoid running injuries, and therefore to get more enjoyment out of it? It’s simple: develop strength and power in your glutes! It’s free, it’s easy, and it will make a big long term difference to your health and happiness!

Running is essentially a series of one legged hops in a row. If your knee is not stable in this movement, you can cause injuries and also waste energy – very important over a long run! In order to improve this, you need to develop the strength and the stability of the movement by focusing on developing power in your glutes! See below for two exercises to introduce into your running program. Do these to become a stronger, faster runner today, and avoid injuries in your future!  

Hip Abduction:

  1. Lie on your side, with your foot in line with your hips, and both hips on top of each other.
  2. Slowly raise and lower your top leg up and down (see Photo 1), ensuring that you feel your glute muscle is activated.
  3. Repeat 20 times on on each leg, for 3 sets.

Single Leg Glute Bridge:

  1. Lie on your back with knees together, and one leg extended off the ground.
  2. Raise your bum up off the ground until there is a straight line from your knee to your hip to your shoulder. (See Photo 2).
  3. Repeat ten times on each leg, twice.

If you are unsure if you are doing it correctly, or if the movement causes you pain, speak to a good sports trainer or physiotherapist about assessing the movement! However, if you can add this in before every run you do, you will quickly find yourself running smoother, and avoiding any niggly injuries which might have been in your path!  
 

About UFIT Clinic

We are a collection of professionals from a range of different disciplines, working together to provide a multi-disciplinary approach to the treatment of our clients. 

Whilst all being experts in our own fields, we are humble enough to listen and learn, and work with each other to provide the best care for our patients. Staff professional development and further education is one of our guiding principals, and one which we are deeply committed to. Our services include; PhysiotherapyStructural IntegrationMassage TherapyMeditationPerformance PsychologyNutrition and Podiatry & Foot Care.

See your UFIT Clinic Physiotherapist to get you back to full health today!

Runners: Your Hips Don't Lie!

Are you a regular runner finding yourself with tedious pains after your runs?

Running, is known for high impact and stress it puts on your bones, muscles and connective tissue around the hip when taking part in this repetitive. It doesn’t matter what age you are, hip pain can occur in all runners. While it may start off mild, hip pain can become much more severe as time goes on if it is not treated properly. Therefore, it is important to take the proper precautions, reduce your training if you're experiencing running-related hip pain.

At the UFIT Clinic, one of the biggest groups of patients we see for injuries are competitive and social runners. Runners, more than most, have a single-minded devotion to their sport – heading out in rain or shine here in Singapore. Unfortunately, this devotion often leads to them “running through the pain” when they feel a niggle in their knees, or ankles. Eventually, this kind of attitude will lead to you ending up in physiotherapy with one of our therapists – and while we’re always happy to see you at the UFIT Clinic, we think you would probably prefer to be still out there jogging!

ufit-clinic-running-physiotherapy

 

So how do you avoid this fate? It all starts with your hips!

When you think about it, running is really just a series of single leg hops, over and over again. If you do not have sufficient strength and stability in your pelvis and hips, this is going to make this single leg hop action unsteady and not very powerful. If this is the case, it will make you both less efficient as a runner, and also more likely to injure yourself – bad news for any runner, social or competitive!

Why?

First, let’s discuss performance: running is about moving from point A to Point B in a straight line, as quickly as possible. Any deviation from this straight line in your body is a waste of energy – you are bleeding power. If your hip and pelvis aren’t stable, this leads to a ‘rolling gait’, and your knees pointing inwards instead of straight ahead – a loss of straight line power. Over the course of a long run, these incremental losses will add up to quite a big waste of your stored energy levels, leaving you with a less impressive run-time than anticipated.

The second issue is injuries. Without hip and pelvic stability, your knees and ankles will roll inwards with every step. Eventually, this will lead to overuse stress on the cartilage on one side of the knee, or your patellar tendon, resulting in a painful chronic injury, making running painful, leading to many physiotherapy appointments, and potentially leading to surgery.  

So how do I know if I have pelvic instability?

You can test yourself very simply.

1.     Single Leg Hop Test: One easy way is to hop up and down in front of a mirror, watching your knee. Does your knee stay in line with your toes, or rotate inwards? Does your upper body stay straight and stable?

2.     Wobble Lunge Test: If you have access to a wobble board, place it out in front of you about three feet away. Then, with a dowel across your shoulders (a broomstick will do), lunge forward, placing your lead foot on the wobble board. Again, are you able to keep your knees in line with your toes? Can you keep a strong, stable body position, or do you collapse to one side?

If your answer to either of these questions is ‘No’– I suggest you talk to a good personal trainer at UFIT, or a physiotherapist at the UFIT Clinic, before you commit to a regular running schedule. They should be able to assess your running and prescribe you some hip strengthening and pelvic stability exercises to ensure that you remain injury free, and also become a stronger, faster runner.

Do it for your running times, and do it for your knees!

If this sounds like you, come and see one of our Physiotherapists today – www.ufitclinic.com

About the Author

Declan Halpin has always maintained a strong sporting interest, and has previously worked as an Academy Physiotherapist for Crystal Palace Football Club (a professional football club in London, England), and as a Rehabilitation Coach for the Western Province Stormers Academy (a professional rugby club from Cape Town, South Africa). Declan is our Senior Physiotherapist at the UFIT Clinic heading up Singapore's only clinic that combines an international team of experts from multi-disciplinary backgrounds  to ensure that your health is always at the forefront. 

 

Understanding the Healing Power of Rolfing - Structural Integration.

Rolfing or Structural Integration is a system of soft tissue manipulation and movement education that organises the body in gravity in order to achieve balance. 

Rolfing was created by Dr. Ida Rolf who received her PH.D in biochemistry in 1920, she then furthered her knowledge through scientific work in organic chemistry.

In creating Rolfing, Dr Rolf, applied her knowledge of science to seek answers for health and wellbeing and embraced a wide range of approaches including  Osteopathy, Chiropractic medicine , Yoga and the Alexander Technique.

Bringing together a variety of disciplines Dr Rolf discovered that she could achieve remarkable changes in posture and structure by manipulating the body’s Myofascial system, she believed that everything is connected. Eventually she named her work StructuralIntegration.

Structural Integration is a type of bodywork that focuses on the connective tissue or fascia of the body. Fascia is the biological fabric that holds us together, essential to the dance between stability and movement , and crucial in high performance and central in recovery from injury.

Fascia is designed to be elastic and move freely with muscles and bones. Injury, stress, work related repetitive movements can cause fascia to lose its elasticity and become shorter, tighter and denser. Tightened fascia pulls our muscles and skeleton out of proper alignment , which can cause pain, discomfort and fatigue.

Structural Integration at UFIT Clinic works to lengthen, stretch and soften this tissue to improve posture and bring the body’s natural structure into proper balance, alignment and integration.

Structural integration is beneficial for all types of people, Some  patients come to ease chronic back, neck and joint pain and others come hoping to improve their athletic performance or to keep in top condition to prevent or quickly recover from injuries

In general a body that is more aligned and balanced in gravity moves with more ease, fluidity, efficiency and grace.  An aligned and balanced body can improve breathing and increase energy, boost self-confidence and relieve physical and mental stress.

 

About the Author – Maria Hussain

I’ve been been practicing bodywork for more than 10 years and I’m a qualified Structural Integration practitioner, studying with Tom Myers the author of Anatomy Trains and the founder of KMI Structural Integration,  Meyers is an advanced Rolfer with more than 40 years’ experience. For more information on Rolfing visit www.anatomytrains.com/at/kmi/experience/

The sessions are practiced at UFIT Clinic, 6 Raffles Quay and to find out more about Maria Hussain and her work with Structural Integration and Fascia Muscle.

All our blogs are written in conjunction with our sister site ufit.com.sg